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Anyone Tried Simpleology?

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Bruce Hoag 3 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #5241

    Scott Hogue
    Participant

    I used to use it, but they kept changing it. I hate having to waste time learning how to do something all over again that I could do just fine yesterday. It lost me. They even changed what they called things, but originally I found it useful.

    I am thinking of how it used to be as I create my platform.

    Comments?

    Scott Hogue CChH
    Follow me in the "Use What You Learn Challenge" as I create a website using what I learn from Sean that is a Platform for my niche:
    http://www.threestepstowealth.com

    The thread on this group that explains it:
    http://preneurpal.com/forums/topic/own-the-game-and-win-it/#post-1747

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  • #5243

    Bruce Hoag
    Participant

    Can you elaborate on this, Scott, and provide a link?

    It seems that a lot of people in different countries use this term for their businesses, and they all refer to different things.

    Bruce Hoag PhD
    The Internet Marketing Psychologist
    The Mindful Writer - for deep and persuasive copy

    • #5246

      Scott Hogue
      Participant

      http://www.simpleology.com/

      It is Mark Joyner’s project. It combines time “management” tools with goals achievement and training. Of course you can’t manage time.

      The idea was here is where you are X and this is where you want to be Y, now list everything you have to do to get from X to Y and leave out everything else. Now focus on those necessary steps and cut out all distractions. Keep it simple.

      It got over being simple a long time ago and they have even changed the names of what they call some of the features, but I found it interesting and helpful in its early form.

      Take one idea. You do a brain dump first thing in the morning. Put down everything on your mind, money problems, taxes, project deadline at work, anniversary present you have to buy for your spouse, whatever is on your mind you put on the list. Now you can forget about it and go on with your major goals and life plans since you have it down and can go back to it later. It frees up the mind’s resources to focus on one item at a time in a more laser like focus.

      You used to could set alerts, make plans, even do systems and procedures, but I am not sure what it is like now, I think it is on the 5.8 release currently.

      I like the idea of a “dashboard” you go to with resources in one place. I like the idea of a place that is a platform with training. Have money problems and money projects? Put it down in the goals section and take the training on money and project management.

      I keep trying a few times a year to go back to it, but it is not intuitive to me and they keep changing it and making it so frustrating.

      You should see how many up sells he does, page after page, if you want to take advantage of some bonus or offer.

      best.

      Scott Hogue CChH
      Follow me in the "Use What You Learn Challenge" as I create a website using what I learn from Sean that is a Platform for my niche:
      http://www.threestepstowealth.com

      The thread on this group that explains it:
      http://preneurpal.com/forums/topic/own-the-game-and-win-it/#post-1747

    • #5248

      Bruce Hoag
      Participant

      Ironically, it doesn’t sound simple. Instead, it seems unnecessarily complicated and distracting.

      Why would I want to spend the best hours of my day writing down everything that I can think of that I need to do? All that will do is make me feel overwhelmed.

      I like the Chrome extension, Momentum. I can create one or more to-do lists with it, and refer to it whenever I want to.

      The night before, I make a note of what I want to do the following day. At most, I only want one main thing on that list; not 10 or 20.

      Even if you have a lot to do, it seems to me that it’s a distraction to spend a lot of time writing it all down.

      For me, when I think of something, unless it’s urgent, I’ll make a note and put it someplace where I can find it when I need it, but not be reminded of it all the time.

      Bruce Hoag PhD
      The Internet Marketing Psychologist
      The Mindful Writer - for deep and persuasive copy

    • #5251

      Scott Hogue
      Participant

      I probably didn’t do the original version justice in my description, but the mind dump is well accepted as a technique to free your mind up. You don’t have to worry about missing things like deadlines and what not since you have them down on paper (or in this case down in the software) to refer to. Sort of a security blanket. I am one of those that worry to keep things from slipping by, although I am much better than I used to be. We also often count worry as activity, which it is, just not productive. So we can feel we are doing something by worrying (magical thinking, not logical) and that wastes effort we could put where it would work.

      Something like this:

      So what is on your mind?
      Write it all down.
      Look it over and pick what is appropriate to work on today.
      Do the same tomorrow and allow yourself the freedom to not think on those things again until in the morning or whenever you set your review.

      Much like we put our bill due dates on a calendar so we won’t forget and to free us up from worrying or checking on every bill every day.

      In industry we found planning paid back on average about a tenfold return in productivity. So a little time spent this way can be well worth it.

      It sounds like you do much the same Bruce in you write things down so you won’t forget them and free up your mind to do what is pressing. Just a different approach to the same task, keeping up with things.

      When things are gaseous and without form I feel overwhelmed, but when listed one, two, three on a list I feel in control.

      I remember being sent to a time management course by my company, which is ridiculous, since we can’t manage time.

      This guru that was earning no telling how much told us to write down the top three things we needed to do that day and no more. That was enough for me.

      I got up and walked out, although I did come back since there was no where to go. I typically used a yellow legal pad and wrote down 25 things for the morning, then after lunch I transferred any that were not done to another page and continued until I had 25 more. My goal was to do 50 planned tasks a day and cover anything that came up as it happened. 40 or more completed planned tasks was common and I fought the fires as they occurred. Three things a day wouldn’t cut it. I did more than that on the phone on the way to work.

      best,

      Scott Hogue CChH
      Follow me in the "Use What You Learn Challenge" as I create a website using what I learn from Sean that is a Platform for my niche:
      http://www.threestepstowealth.com

      The thread on this group that explains it:
      http://preneurpal.com/forums/topic/own-the-game-and-win-it/#post-1747

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #5253

      Bruce Hoag
      Participant

      Several years ago, I wrote a book, which if you’re interested in the topic and flushed with cash, you can get on Amazon. LOL

      It was a huge project. Biggest thing I’ve ever undertaken. Something like 500 references.

      I created a folder for each chapter, and whenever I came across something that seemed interesting, instead of getting dragged into it, I made enough of a note so that I could find it again, and put it in the chapter folder. Even though I didn’t have answers at the time, I knew that by the time I got to that chapter, I know what to do with it.

      That approach work well for me. It might not be everyone’s cup of tea.

      Having said that, that particular method makes a lot more sense to me than making a list of 50 things that need to be done.

      The other problem is that making that list, at least at the beginning, makes the less important stuff seem more important than it is. And that makes you less productive; not more.

      So for me, the thing to do is to record somewhere that the activity needs to be accomplished, but to put it someplace where it won’t distract me from what does need to be done now.

      Bruce Hoag PhD
      The Internet Marketing Psychologist
      The Mindful Writer - for deep and persuasive copy

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #5256

      Scott Hogue
      Participant

      I think it is wonderful when we have these micro disagreements, all conversation they say is based on disagreement, since if one person says Harvey’s has the best hamburgers and the other person agrees there is not much further that conversation can go, but if the second person says, “I don’t know, have you tried Hamburger Sallies? They make a pretty good bacon and cheddar burger with onion rings on it,” then you have the basis for a conversation.

      However you keep track of things I don’t think it matters what you call it, making a list, doing a mind dump, putting things in folders or on a lazy Susan. In every case it is a process of putting things where you can find them later.

      I think, but do not assert, that we can agree that keeping up with things is important.

      Probably a lessor number of people would agree that making a list such as a shopping list or a to do list or putting things in a folder for future reference or deadlines on a calendar would relieve us of a little stress, being a sort of security blanket we can turn to in time of need for that information and with less stress allow us to focus on things one at a time and those that are at hand without worrying about things falling through the cracks.

      I can only speak for myself, but I can hardly remember five things to pick up at the store without a list by the time I get there, but if I have a list I can literally keep up with a countless number of things (which is what it seems like when my wife sends me shopping) I can also say that the fear of disappointing my wife by not getting something she wanted or needed goes away when she hands me a list and I don’t have to drive to town repeating “hair spray number 8 Hold, butter, jelly, trash bags, paper towels, chopped almonds, brown sugar, chocolate chips, carpet cleaner and so on over and over” (which I can now relate to you days after the trip because I still have the list) as I drive to town I can go on to think about my business, my grandchildren, the green field I pass that is still green in winter and the sun peeking out behind a cloud, or maybe even another Christmas present for my wife that tolerates me and my little idiosyncrasies.

      In my work with hoarders I found that in some cases they didn’t want to move things because they kept up with things or you might say ordered their lives by location. The bills might look scattered across the kitchen and dining room to you and me, but to them they were in plain sight and being ever present kept them from failing to pay them on time. An empty butter wrapper reminded them to get butter at the store and broken things were reminders of the ones that gave them to the hoarder, an emotional connection that they felt they would lose if they threw them away. Did their methods work? To some extent I would have to say so, but of course it caused problems in their lives and they got to where their lives just didn’t work for the clutter and baggage. However understanding them and how they thought and they ordered their lives helped me help them. They weren’t slobs or lazy, they just looked at things differently. If I could find a better way for them to accomplish their goals without the mess then I could make a difference. Trust was the first step.

      Photo books, videos and remembrance drawers replaced broken things someone had given them that they kept to remind them of the dear loved one. A grocery list replaced butter wrappers and empty ketchup bottles. I can’t say that I would enjoy making this my life’s work, but it was interesting to see why many hoarders hoard, it wasn’t like you might think at all. It often started out as a way to keep things and to have some measure of control in your life.

      More of my ramblings,
      best,

      Scott Hogue CChH
      Follow me in the "Use What You Learn Challenge" as I create a website using what I learn from Sean that is a Platform for my niche:
      http://www.threestepstowealth.com

      The thread on this group that explains it:
      http://preneurpal.com/forums/topic/own-the-game-and-win-it/#post-1747

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #5284

      Bruce Hoag
      Participant

      When you’re writing something on the scale of 99K words, you have to come up with a system that will enable you to remember things when you need them. I knew that when I got to each chapter folder, I’d have a much clearer idea of how relevant the material was and where to put it.

      Some things got put into later folders; others were discarded.

      If I’d tried to solve all of the problems simultaneously, the project would never have been completed.

      Bruce Hoag PhD
      The Internet Marketing Psychologist
      The Mindful Writer - for deep and persuasive copy

      1 user thanked author for this post.
  • #5245

    Malik Ahmad
    Participant

    I agree with you Scott I used to use it before all the changes.

    I just started doing simpleology again (the last two weeks or so). I still use the old forms and names before all the changes.

    http://www.simpleology.com

    7 Figure Marketer Reveals...
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  • #5272

    Sean Mize
    Keymaster

    There’s one thing to keep in mind about ALL productivity systems:

    1) You have to find out WHICH system works for YOU. Some things work for me but not you, some things work for you but not me.

    the second thing to know is this:

    YOU must FIRST be committed to making whatever it is, work . .

    You see, NO productivity system will work if you aren’t committed to the work you are doing . .

    Sean

    Do you want to learn how to start a coaching program that stabilizes your income and changes lives? If so, visit http://www.AnyoneCanCoach.com

    Sean

    3 users thanked author for this post.

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