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how to fit in a new business entity

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This topic contains 12 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Scott Hogue 3 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #389

    Dana Cassell
    Participant

    I’m trying to fit a totally new “enterprise” or platform into my time available – already have a full-time online business. Have you managed this? or are you doing so also? I’m wondering what you’ve found to work best – allocating smaller bits of time to the new entity on a daily basis – or planning larger time segments for it but less frequently?

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  • #400

    Don Sturgill
    Participant

    For me, it’s not the time so much as the focus, Dana. I can extend time by working daylight to midnight … but when my focus is diverted it costs both time and quality. Some are better at it than others, I’m sure. But bouncing back and forth messes with my day big time. I can chunk effectively … but must make sure each chunk gets proper attention.

  • #423

    Dana Cassell
    Participant

    You’re right, Don – I think more attention to the focus would be helpful, whether a short time period or longer one. So easy to slip off into other thoughts that come to mind uninvited.

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  • #427

    Dana, it really sounds like you’re ready for this next level in your business. Congratulations!

    ♥ Coach Claire

    NichirenBuddhistShaman.com

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  • #620

    Bruce Hoag
    Participant

    What you need to do, Dana, is to work solely on the things that only you can do and then outsource the rest.

    Perry Marshall talks about $10/hr work, $100/hr work, $1K/hr and $10K/hr work.

    To the extent possible, you need to put your time in on doing the $1K and $10K/hr work. If you do that, then you’ll have the time you need.

    Thing is that most people spend much of their time doing $10/hr work.

    Bruce Hoag PhD
    The Internet Marketing Psychologist
    The Mindful Writer - for deep and persuasive copy

  • #781

    Dana Cassell
    Participant

    I know you’re right, Bruce. Haven’t gotten past the “it takes longer to find and explain than to do it myself” stumbling block.

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  • #807

    Bruce Hoag
    Participant

    The way to get past the “it takes longer to find and explain it” problem is to create systems.

    That’s a fancy way of saying, create a checklist, a series of detailed steps about how to do a particular task.

    Yes, it’s time-consuming.

    But you’ll only ever have to do it once, at least until the software you’re using changes significantly.

    I’ve done this sort of thing for myself on occasion.

    There are some things that I have to do, but don’t do often enough to remember all the steps. So I make a list of the steps so that the next time I do it I don’t have to spend hours figuring it out again.

    Once you have your system, then you can give it to the person to whom you’ve outsourced the work.

    Here’s another way to look at it.

    Add up all the hours you’ve spent doing it yourself and compare it to the time it would take to create a system. You may be surprised at how much time you’ve lost by following your approach.

    As your business grows, you simply won’t have the time or energy to do it all yourself.

    That means that you have to create systems so that you can delegate work.

    Bruce Hoag PhD
    The Internet Marketing Psychologist
    The Mindful Writer - for deep and persuasive copy

  • #867

    Dana Cassell
    Participant

    Good suggestion, Bruce, for those tasks that can be outsourced – and I’ve added “note what can be outsourced, then create how-to aids” to my strategy planning – but that still leaves plenty of “stuff” to do for a new endeavor, utilizing the freed up time. So still curious as to whether others have found it more effective to work in new endeavors in small, daily time slots – or less frequent but longer time blocks – as Don suggests.

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  • #873

    Bruce Hoag
    Participant

    Another thing you can try, Dana, is to break up your tasks into 20 minute chunks of time.

    That doesn’t sound like much, but it’s amazing how many of these there are in a day.

    Even if you only do one small step, it’s one less that you’ll have to do later.

    Thing is that there’s no silver bullet.

    You have to give yourself the mental space to think this through.

    I have to change my plans and schedule constantly.

    If I get one day in the week that goes according to plan, I’m doing well.

    Could be a series of late nights.

    Fatigue.

    Distractions.

    Little things that aren’t very important unless they’re left for too long when they become urgent.

    Keep your schedule as flexible as you can make it.

    Create a routine for the next few days that you can live with.

    Follow it, then evaluate what went right and what didn’t.

    Revise it and start again.

    It’s what I do.

    Bruce Hoag PhD
    The Internet Marketing Psychologist
    The Mindful Writer - for deep and persuasive copy

  • #879

    I know I’m the newbie, but I think you know what works best for you, Dana. Focus is key, just like Don said. Are you the kind of person who has a long attention span or a short one? If you naturally keep your focus for long periods of time, maybe you should schedule large blocks of time for yourself to take advantage of the momentum that’s created as you work longer. Otherwise, focus for shorter periods of time on a more frequent basis.

    ♥ Coach Claire

    NichirenBuddhistShaman.com

    Discover the joy in every situation...

    FREE full reading of your choice - for members only!

  • #940

    Dana Cassell
    Participant

    Claire, I think my attention span has changed over the years – seems much easier to be diverted now than in years past. Or that may simply be a result of today’s online hyperkinetic world. I do find that once I get into something, it becomes more difficult to bend to those distractions. So I appreciate Bruce’s suggestion to set up a plan and give it a try. It reminds me of a strategy I used years ago – 90 minutes on a project gave me enough time to accomplish something but was short enough to fit it in. I think I will try that for this coming week and see how it goes. That should leave enough time for current tasks/commitments. Appreciate all the suggestions.

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  • #991

    Bruce Hoag
    Participant

    I may have this wrong, Dana, but I seem to remember reading that Graham Greene wrote his novels on top of the refrigerator.

    Now your imagination can go wild here.

    The picture I have in my mind is of him standing next to the appliance and using the top as a desk.

    There may be some reading this who instead would see him sitting, cross-legged, on top of it.

    Either way, I’m sure that he wrote in spurts – short bursts of time. And sometimes that’s how we have to work.

    Bruce Hoag PhD
    The Internet Marketing Psychologist
    The Mindful Writer - for deep and persuasive copy

  • #1044

    Scott Hogue
    Participant

    I am as bad as anyone, maybe worse. No doubt coaches need coaches.

    I am trying to remember the famous female author that had an invalid husband she cared for and children to raise. She decided she had to write for them to have an income and live.

    After the children left home she said she actually found it harder to write. She didn’t have the money pressures and without children she struggled with inertia. Things in their life gave her ideas to write about. inertia is not a choice when the house is full of children.

    So her disadvantage she used as an advantage. I can imagine her thinking if only I didn’t have to worry about money or take care of the children, then I could really write!

    Is there a way you could actually use your hectic routine in some way as an advantage?

    I know it sounds crazy, but when I work with people and they say they can’t do this or that to solve their problems, I explain nothing changes until something changes. You have to break out of your I can’t succeed under these circumstances thinking.

    If you had to work your new goals into your routine or face unacceptable consequences, how would you do that?

    Instead of working on your goal tasks first, maybe the best goal is to first work on better ways of getting things done.

    New techniques, new approaches, out sourcing, cutting out non essential items…

    The best of “luck”

    Scott Hogue CChH

    Scott Hogue CChH
    Follow me in the "Use What You Learn Challenge" as I create a website using what I learn from Sean that is a Platform for my niche:
    http://www.threestepstowealth.com

    The thread on this group that explains it:
    http://preneurpal.com/forums/topic/own-the-game-and-win-it/#post-1747

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