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Benefits Of A Newsletter

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This topic contains 23 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  Sean Mize 3 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #167

    Robert Mason
    Participant

    Scott, this is highly pertinent to me. I am about to offer a paid newsletter in support of one of my niches. I know it will be a challenge to keep it interesting and relevant, but I am giving it a go.

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    • #298

      Gregory Bey
      Participant

      A News Letter will always work for an interested prospect. Just consider the News Letters you are interested in. What News Letters do you always open. I open a news Letter because I know that I will get information that will help me with the subject of that News Letter.

      One way to keep your subscribers interested is to tell stories.

      I kept subscribers interested in a News Letter that I published by telling them I was going to set a goal for myself.

      I told them that I was going to set a goal for myself of making $100.00 per day, starting from scratch with a budget of only $500.00

      I told them that I would tell them every thing that I did to reach my goal in my weekly News Letter.

      This way I would keep them interested enough to see if I would reach my goal. This way I had a better chance of them opening my News Letter

      Then after 52 weeks I have a product that I offer as a free gift to any one who visits my web site.

      Gregory Bey

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  • #171

    Elaine Guinn
    Participant

    I send most of my email newsletters through Constant Contact using one of their templates that I customized to coordinate with my main website. While not the best autoresponder (they just recently added a campaign function), I find their templates easier to use. And… you can send just a text version if you wish. I also use AWeber occasionally, but I find their templates more difficult to work with.

    To answer your question, I don’t really think it matters a whole lot if your content is good. However, I think breaking up a newsletter with graphics and white space creates more interest. It certainly does with printed newsletters. (I create and sell both printed and electronic newsletters in my niche.) Hope that helps.

  • #178

    Suzanne Sukhram
    Participant

    This is a great question!

    Elaine, how often do you send out your newsletters?

  • #185

    Doria Musaga
    Participant

    I think newsletters are a bit more work than an email. There are probably a lot of platforms out there that make it easy and so it may be worth the extra effort to do free newsletters especially if you are tech savvy or have a way to churn them out because I think a newsletter gives you more clout and credibility. In the long run you can also monetize them as I see a lot of them do.

  • #188

    Robert Mason
    Participant

    Not Elaine, but – I am sending my newsletter out each month. Any more often and it might be difficult to keep it a valuable resource.

  • #199

    Melody Wilhelm
    Participant

    I’ve ghostwritten newsletters for businesses ranging from dog daycare to business analysis to breast reconstruction surgeons, and when you have a template to go by, it goes faster and your audience looks forward to receiving it. For example, one newsletter featured events going on in that city each month, and that was the section most people commented on. A newsletter is a great way to show your personality because you decide the format, sections, and content.

  • #210

    Jan Sandhouse Hurst
    Participant

    Scott (and all), I have an entire course on newsletters (two actually) based on years of creating dozens of newsletters, and I’ll be happy to share info here.

    First question: What is your goal? How are you planning to use your newsletter? Is it to build a relationship with your existing community? Is it to get new traffic/subscribers? Will you be using it online or offline?

    Next, who is your target audience?

    Identifying your target audience and goal will help get you started in the right direction. Then we can take the next step forward.

    And yes, a newsletter can definitely be a great marketing tool or income generator.

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    • #216

      Robert Mason
      Participant

      Jan

      Those are great points – thank you. I shall bear those in mind as I progress with my newsletter.

      Your courses sound interesting – I shall look out for them.

    • #253

      Scott Hogue
      Participant

      Thanks for the responses. To offer more info per the questions and discussion. I was thinking of offering a free newsletter as a subscriber magnet with monthly helpful info and a weekly or bi weekly premium newsletter possibly that would contain a lot of my membership info for the month. Sort of give them the skinny and direct them to the membership if they wanted more detailed info and guidance.

      It would be nice to have subscribers actually pay for something that had a little marketing to them mixed in

      and

      We get so used to plain emails, I was thinking a newsletter with frames and a few images might get more attention, appear more valuable.

      Scott Hogue CChH

      Scott Hogue CChH
      Follow me in the "Use What You Learn Challenge" as I create a website using what I learn from Sean that is a Platform for my niche:
      http://www.threestepstowealth.com

      The thread on this group that explains it:
      http://preneurpal.com/forums/topic/own-the-game-and-win-it/#post-1747

  • #214

    Elaine Guinn
    Participant

    I create a new newsletter for my niche to use each month. It is an actual newsletter that they purchase (printed and/or electronic) about Shaklee and Shaklee products.

    I market this newsletter… and my other products… by email through Constant Contact. I also send them more personal emails (also through Constant Contact) with little tips, techniques, stories, free reports, etc. I just don’t do it often enough.

  • #230

    Jan Sandhouse Hurst
    Participant

    Robert, I’d be happy to help you in exchange for a testimonial. Sean, would it be possible to share links to free training with the group? I’m re-doing my challenge, and would love to get feedback while helping members of the group.

  • #233

    That would be so great, Jan! I hope Sean gives you the okay. I don’t feel that I am far enough along in my business to think about newsletters, but maybe you will prove me wrong, Jan. I think keeping it as simple as possible when you’re just starting out is key. But maybe it’s not that difficult? Once I get into the rhythm of the daily email as prescribed by Sean, a monthly newsletter might be something worth looking into.

    ♥ Coach Claire

    NichirenBuddhistShaman.com

    Discover the joy in every situation...

    FREE full reading of your choice - for members only!

  • #236

    Dana Cassell
    Participant

    I’ve been sending out a free newsletter about every two weeks, offering it to both members and non-members. I use a text version, but format it in WordPerfect (yes, still prefer WP over Word!) as to font style/size, boldfacing, italics, etc. I use short paragraphs with **** lines clearly separating next topic – so easy to read on any device.

    I “publish to HTML,” which Word likely does also. That saves the HTML on my desktop, but also opens it inside a browser window. There a right-click and click on “view page source” (using Chrome, but other browsers must have the same ability) provides the entire document in HTML.

    I select all that source code then copy it (control C on a PC).

    Next, in Aweber, I send a broadcast message, under “Create a Message” use HTML Editor, then click on “Source” tab and replace the small snippet of code with my saved code, using control v.

    Save & Exit, and schedule a mailing, same as a regular email.

    The newsletter (or eZine) is mostly helpful tips and links, with in-house promos and periodic affiliate promos as warranted. It’s useful for getting new members and encouraging current members to renew (some are on auto-payment, but most get renewal notices.

    Hope this gives you an idea – it’s not as complicated as spelling it out makes it seem LOL

    Need anything written or edited?
    Writers-Editors Network
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  • #249

    That’s so great, Dana! Thank you for explaining how you do this. Do your subscribers also receive other emails from you, or is this how you communicate with your list?

    ♥ Coach Claire

    NichirenBuddhistShaman.com

    Discover the joy in every situation...

    FREE full reading of your choice - for members only!

  • #285

    Dana Cassell
    Participant

    Claire, I send out a monthly 8-page print newsletter (34th year, I think) and post the PDF edition inside the Member area (some pay less and do not receive the print edition). I also post resources and trainings (PDFs, videos) inside the Member area and send out an email to members whenever anything is added to the Members area. We also sponsor an annual writing contest, so have a Contests listing page for other contests (as well as our own, of course) and have a separate list (members and non-members) to send a notice to whenever a new contest is posted (probably 1 to 2 times a week on average). That contests page is there mainly to bring people to our site area where we have our own guidelines and entry form posted. I also offer a free PDF download of our monthly newsletter, and they go on a list with several auto-follow-ups; I broadcast to them when I have a special membership offer or affiliate offer etc..

    Need anything written or edited?
    Writers-Editors Network
    is the place to go for editorial help from professional writers and editors

  • #294

    Carol Bremner
    Participant

    I’ve done Paper.li newsletters for clients. I always tell them to get the paid version so they can customize their paper with their own banner, ads, and content, as well as the curated content and images that Paper.li pulls in for you. It takes a bit of time to train the software to curate the right articles for you, or you can only content you’ve curated. It makes a really professional looking paper that can be sent out through your email service.

  • #328

    Suzanne Sukhram
    Participant

    Gregory,

    Great idea on keeping your readers interested! Curious – is your newsletter a paid one?

  • #363

    Don Sturgill
    Participant

    How many newsletters do you get and read, Scott?

  • #637

    Bruce Hoag
    Participant

    I wrote a newsletter for about four years.

    It was free and somehow I managed to get a few hundred subscribers.

    I never monetized the list though.

    Don’t think I knew how at the time. (It was before I met Sean.)

    When I finally decided to stop writing it, I offered all of the issues for sale to the list.

    People had kept them!

    That should have told me that I was onto something.

    Bruce Hoag PhD
    The Internet Marketing Psychologist
    The Mindful Writer - for deep and persuasive copy

  • #1722

    Sean Mize
    Keymaster

    A newsletter is a great way to build rapport and increase perceived value.

    I noticed someone said a newsletter is more work than an email.

    Yes, but if it’s 4x as much work, and you do one once a week, in addition to a daily email, and it 4x your effect . . .would it be worth it?

    Sean

    Do you want to learn how to start a coaching program that stabilizes your income and changes lives? If so, visit http://www.AnyoneCanCoach.com

    Sean

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  • #1724

    Bruce Hoag
    Participant

    It really depends on whether or not your newsletter contains more value than your emails.

    It should.

    Most people don’t have the time to read a newsletter length email every day.

    Besides, you can deal with a topic at a much deeper level in a newsletter.

    And people are more likely to read it because it’s less frequent; unlike an email which may arrive daily.

    So in a way, it’s the wrong question.

    The right question is why do you send emails, and how would a newsletter deliver more or better value?

    Bruce Hoag PhD
    The Internet Marketing Psychologist
    The Mindful Writer - for deep and persuasive copy

  • #1730

    Sean Mize
    Keymaster

    It really depends on whether or not your newsletter contains more value than your emails.

    It should.

    Most people don’t have the time to read a newsletter length email every day.

    Besides, you can deal with a topic at a much deeper level in a newsletter.

    And people are more likely to read it because it’s less frequent; unlike an email which may arrive daily.

    So in a way, it’s the wrong question.

    The right question is why do you send emails, and how would a newsletter deliver more or better value?

    Bruce, I send emails because it allows me to communicate deeply with real people.

    A newsletter wouldn’t necessarily deliver more value, but it might deliver a better perceived value.

    For example, for a rich person, a Ferrari offers a higher perceived value, but it doesn’t get you from point a to point b any better than a Kia.

    For a modest person, a Kia offers a higher perceived value because the payment is lower, not because it’s get you from point a to point b any better than Ferrari.

    Sean

    Do you want to learn how to start a coaching program that stabilizes your income and changes lives? If so, visit http://www.AnyoneCanCoach.com

    Sean

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